The Global Forum for Longevity

The Global Forum for Longevity is an initiative from the AXA Group. As a place for interaction and sharing knowledge between experts and the general public, its aim is to understand longevity...

All about the Forum
A journey into longevity

A journey into longevity

An encounter with people who live longer lives in good health.
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Blue Zones - A journey into longevity

28 March 2011...

On 28 March 2011, the Collège des Bernardins welcomed the Global Forum for Longevity. A wrap-up in pictures captures the best moments during this day-long pluridisciplinary event. Offering a wellspring to participants, looking for ideas, a chance to share and new proposals, it was also a place to hear speakers from all horizons.




29 April 2011

11 concurring points of view on longevity today

Visit a picture gallery of the 11 specialists who spoke at the Global Forum for Longevity. They tell a story about the fruits of their thinking and research on longevity. Each point of view brings us closer to understanding what is today a complex and quickly-evolving topic.

26 April 2011

Relive in pictures the Global Forum for Longevity

"Longevity is not a trick of fate, it is an opportunity." In his opening address, Henri de Castries sets the tone and the pace. See for the first time, or relive, the excitement of this memorable day.

19 April 2011

Premiering the best of clips from the Global Forum for Longevity

See all the speeches of Henri de Castries, Chairman and CEO of AXA, Robert B. Zoellick, President of World Bank Group, and Dr. Daniel Vasella, Chairman of Novartis.

12 April 2011

The French and their perception of longevity

The French and their perception of longevity

The French think that the lengthening of lifetimes is "one of the major events of these last few years," according to an AXA-CSA poll, conducted at the time of the Global Forum for Longevity, 28 March 2011.

07 April 2011

A silver opportunity?

The economist report

It looks at the risks and opportunities faced by businesses as they start to grapple with changing demographics, both in terms of their internal workforces and the changing nature of consumer demand. This report focuses on the trend in developed countries.

29 March 2011

Meetings on 28 March:
the beginning of a long-term commitment for AXA

Meetings on 28 March

"Passionate and passionately committed experts" – it was with those words that Henri de Castries, AXA Chairman and CEO, closed the first Meetings of the Global Forum for Longevity which brought together nearly 250 participants and journalists.

26 March 2011

What does this imply with respect to how life today is charted out, for young people?

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Education, work, retirement
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For the younger generations, longevity opens up prospects for a longer life and the opportunity to take different paths, no longer hinging upon the traditional timescales of life up until now. Could this be an opportunity for all of us to plot out our futures differently?

25 March 2011

Will we receive additional years in good health?

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20 years 50%
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While the number of dependent individuals will be quantitatively higher, longevity will also mean that the number of elderly people in good health and active, putting together plans for their lives, will increase.

24 March 2011

Will we able to push back the bounds of ageing?

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25% 80 years 1 out of 4
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If life expectancy becomes longer, the question will remain as to how many of those additional years will actually be spent in good health. The ability to age while maintaining good physical and cognitive ability is dependent on genetics, but also on many socio-economic factors.

22 March 2011

Can longevity continue to sustain growth?

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30 years 1.5 billion 4%
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Over the course of the 21st century, the increase in life expectancy was the main source from which wealth was created, along with innovation. The challenge for our societies will be to ensure that our populations' longevity and ageing continues to drive global economic growth.

15 March 2011

Is there a limit to how far lifespan can be extended?

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122 years 82 years 15000
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From the biological standpoint, physiological senescence appears inescapable. And, today, living to age 110 remains a rare occurrence. However, some researchers feel it will be possible to push the boundaries back to age 150, provided significant medical progress is made.

First meetings at the Global Forum for Longevity, Monday, 28 March 2011

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